Creating and re-using video

Simple ways you can create and reuse video to enhance an online learning experience for your students.

See the Eventbrite page for further details about this webinar and to register.

Recordings

If you want to view any recordings of the webinars you can access them in the DEO Staff Development Course in the ‘Session content and webinar recordings’ section.

Contact information

If you have any questions, please contact the DEO by emailing digital-education@bristol.ac.uk

Creating and re-using video

Simple ways you can create and reuse video to enhance an online learning experience for your students.

See the Eventbrite page for further details about this webinar and to register.

Recordings

If you want to view any recordings of the webinars you can access them in the DEO Staff Development Course in the ‘Session content and webinar recordings’ section.

Contact information

If you have any questions, please contact the the DEO by emailing digital-education@bristol.ac.uk

Creating and re-using video

Simple ways you can create and reuse video to enhance an online learning experience for your students.

See the Eventbrite page for further details about this webinar and to register.

Recordings

If you want to view any recordings of the webinars you can access them in the DEO Staff Development Course in the ‘Session content and webinar recordings’ section.

Contact information

If you have any questions, please contact the the DEO by emailing digital-education@bristol.ac.uk

digital education office logo

Video in Teaching and Learning

This workshop aims to introduce staff to the educational application of video, for example providing content prior to a lecture, clarification post lecture or feedback. It will take participants through the planning, design, production and evaluation of media rich resources.  The workshop will include a hands on session where participants can use the Mediasite Desktop recorder to create and publish content.

This workshop will be facilitated by Pete Herbert. 

To book, please see our booking form on Eventbrite. Video in teaching and learning.

Two students recording using a video camera and boom microphone
Education Enhancement Funds

Developing a guide to support the use of video in undergraduate assessment

A Teaching Innovation Grant was awarded to Dr Emily Bell, Dr Rose Murray and Dr Andy Wakefield for the academic year 2017/18 – you can find a summary of the project they undertook with their grant below. If you would like to read the full report, please contact bilt-info@bristol.ac.uk

Project summary

Project members (PMs) (Bell, Murray and Wakefield) are developing an open-access framework to enable the easy implementation of innovative and creative assessment. This includes an interactive guide for teachers and learners which supports the creation of video as a means of assessment. This guide provides step-by-step instructions on how to use audio-visual production/editing software as well as helpful advice on suitable equipment. PMs are also creating an appropriate, transdisciplinary framework for evaluation of the students’ video projects. By focusing the assessment of the video at group level and embedding this within a portfolio of supporting tasks the PMs hope that their guidance will be applicable to a greater number of disciplines within higher education.

This novel assessment method was embedded into a field course module (June 2018), with 20 students working in groups of three or four. Students were instilled with a wide range of transferrable skills as well as having the opportunity to stretch their creative legs. In tandem, and via the same processes, students’ confidence was evaluated in four key skills areas (academic self-efficacy, groupwork, communication and digital capabilities) via data collection from pre-post questionnaires and student reflective critiques. Preliminary data analyses suggest that student confidence increased over
the course of the week in these areas.

You can find the video guide here

Conclusions
 

Despite only preliminary analysis of the data gathered thus far, it is apparent that participants who took the filmmaking course perceived an increased level of confidence in several different skill areas; academic skills, social efficacy, communication sk ills and digital capabilities. The qualitative responses corroborate findings from the quantitative responses, and the authors look forward to evaluating the reflective critique data later in the year. On reflection, one of the main themes identified from the data was the increased confidence particularly in social efficacy. This was highlighted as a particular cause for anxiety or apprehension prior to the course by the participants, yet by the end, it was clearly an area in which participants had grown in confidence. This will be explored further as the project progresses. As this was a single field course from a collection of ~15 courses which run each year, it would be interesting to evaluate other courses to explore whether this increased confidence of participants is replicated, or whether it is a unique quality of the film making course. The authors hope to repeat this study in the next academic year with the following cohort of students to test the robustness of these findings.

Video for Teaching and Learning (DEO)


This workshop aims to introduce staff to the educational application of media, for example providing content prior to a lecture, clarification post lecture or feedback. It will take participants through the planning, design, production and evaluation of media rich resources. The workshop will include a hands on session where participants can use the Mediasite Desktop recorder to create and publish content.

By the end of the workshop participants will:

  • Have explored and considered how video could be used as part of their teaching practice

  • Have planned and designed a media resource considering the intended learning outcomes, content and length

  • Have produced and published a recording using the Mediasite Desktop Recorder and Blackboard

  • Have viewed the analytics area of a recording for evaluating its use by the intended audience

  • Have a knowledge of other tools available to use

  • Know where to access further support

500 Words

YouTube goes maths!

Author: Sven Friedemann

School/ Centre: School of Physics

Sven Friedemann tells us about the videos he developed for his 4th Year Physics students to help them understand complex mathematical derivations.

Teaching maths-heavy courses requires going over derivations step-by-step. Feedback from students has told us that this can not be done effectively using Powerpoint slides as the lecturer inevitably goes too fast and students find it hard to stay engaged. Consequently, the chalk-and-blackboard, or the equivalent pen-and-whiteboard, remain the most-used method for teaching courses like my 4th year “Magnetism and Superconductivity”. I really like the course as it allows me to baffle students with demonstrations, whilst still calculating these phenomena together using fundamental models.

When I used this method of going through the derivations on the blackboard, it leaves students with the dilemma: either they copy down every step, or they listen and follow the narrative. The student that has copied will have good notes but might have missed the tricks and important discussion. My videos provide students with a new resource to review all the steps of the derivations in their own time whilst absorbing and participating in the lectures.

I have recorded about 15 videos, between 5 and 15 min long, which go over the most difficult derivations of my course. For this I used my Android tablet and a microphone headset. The videos are now available through Blackboard.

A key benefit is that I can reuse the videos each year without much extra work.

I have seen positive uptake, both in the usage statistics, and in the lectures. I analysed last year’s statistics for my CREATE project and found that at least half of the students used these videos very heavily, with some students watching them 5 times or more. Whilst students did mostly watch them for immediate exam preparations last year I can see earlier uptake alongside lectures this year. This has a very positive effect on lectures with students much more engaged, asking questions and checking my calculations on the blackboard.

These videos have helped to transform the course into one that is suitable for the digital age; with students benefitting from online resources, while at the same time keeping the personal contact that lectures provide.

Sven Friedemann