500 Words, Teaching Stories

Six ways to engage your audience online (regardless of bandwidth or timezone!)

1. Start with an activity.

Engage students from the beginning by asking them to write a question they’d like to be answered during the session, drawing a picture of their initial impressions of the topic or even take a selfie of their expression towards the day’s session and sharing it with the group! By doing this they make an initial investment in the session and you can use it to come back and reflect on these contributions at the end of the session.

2. Outline the session.

People want to know what they’re in for before investing their time. Have you ever checked out the menu at a restaurant before you’ve been? Looked at the running time for a film before you’ve watched it? The same applies here. Outline each activity, what materials are needed for it and how long you expect it to take – that way students can plan around how much time they have. Don’t forget to include those all-important ILO’s!

3. Break it down.

Just because your students can sit through an hour-long lecture you give doesn’t mean they can do the same online… Try and make any ‘passive’ activity (videos, podcasts, narrated presentations, reading (without note-taking)) no longer than 10 minutes at a time.

4. 50% active, 50% passive.

This is ambitious, but a great target to aim for when you’re designing your content. ‘Active’ includes anything the student has to do: write, type, draw, play, interact, take quizzes; passive includes everything else. Studies have repeatedly shown students benefit from a mix of both of these activities but try and keep the balance in check.

5. Keep telling your stories.

Moving content online doesn’t mean you have to become a robot in your delivery. Stories enrich teaching, creating a personal and emotional connection to the content and therefore make it more memorable and engaging. Try and keep your delivery as close to your classroom style as possible – this is what students are used to and we want to continue that where we possibly can.

6. Gamify it.

Gamifying content shouldn’t be reserved for the super-techy and it doesn’t mean just turning your content into a game. Adding game-like elements to sessions can have a massive impact on engagement and makes the learning more fun. Simple implementations include students moving up ‘levels’ as they move through content, adding quizzes to ‘unlock’ secret content and even having a leaderboard for top contributors to online forums.  

Please get in touch with the BILT Team for more information about how to do anything we’ve mentioned above, or have an idea you want to discuss further with someone on the team.

News

‘Daily Digital’ with PVC-Education, Tansy Jessop

From Thursday 19th March Professor Tansy Jessop, Pro Vice-Chancellor for Education, will host a short “daily digital” on a range of themes relating to online learning and teaching. Tansy will be joined by a number of colleagues, including from BILT and the Digital Education Office, on this digital journey. Topics will include building pedagogic relationships, facilitating discussion, personal tutoring and supervision, co-creation with students, assessment and more.

What is the daily digital?

On some days the “daily digital” will be a short live event.  Live sessions will be recorded so you can catch up later if you can’t make them.

On other days there will be opportunities to engage asynchronously, for example to review a short video or reading and then join an ongoing online discussion.

How long will it take me?

Each “Daily Digital” should take you between 15 and 30 minutes.  

When does it start?

The programme starts with a live session on Thursday 19th March at 10am, and will last 7 working days.

How can I access it?

The “Daily Digital” will take place in Blackboard.  We invite you to enrol on the Blackboard space for full access to the programme.  (Content will be released over the 7 days)

Enrol on the Blackboard Daily Digital space

Alternatively use the following link to access the first live session, which will take place in Blackboard Collaborate.

Guest link to the webinar  

For the live sessions please ensure that you have headphones or sound enabled. Chrome is the recommended browser.

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Blackboard Basics: Marking and Providing Feedback to Online Assignments, see the outcome through the Students’ Eyes (DEO Webinar)

Learn how to make the most of the feedback features in Blackboard inline grading and get an insight into how your students will see their results. As well as talking you through the software we will have time to answer your questions about marking in Blackboard.

This course is suitable for  academic staff and all levels of experience (some basic knowledge is helpful but not necessary). 

This webinar will be presented by Roberta Perli and Roger Gardner from the Digital Education Office.