*CANCELLED* The intangibility and invisibility of liberty crimes in private and public spheres

Speaker: Dr Nadia Aghtaie

Abstract:

This lecture uses the concept of cultural violence (originally coined by Johan Galtung, a pioneer of peace studies) to examine the normalisation of generalised violence within national and international contexts. Consideration will then be given to the specific issue of gendered violence using a range of examples of cultural violence within the US and the Middle East. As part of the discussion, the deeper connection between different forms of implicit and explicit violence and the normalcy of its re-occurrence under the disguise of everyday language, culture and religion will be explored.

I shall argue that apparent stability and surface tranquillity within relationships do not necessarily equate to non-violent states. Violence that goes beyond the physical, psychological, sexual and financial will be discussed showing that there are types of violence, which remain intangible and invisible, but which can be classed as ‘liberty crimes’ within both the private and public spheres.

Bio:

Nadia Aghtaie is the Director for the BSc Childhood Studies Programmes. She is a senior lecturer in gender and violence at the Centre for Gender and Violence Research. She has a longstanding association with the University of Bristol, having completed her BSc (Childhood Studies), MSc (Policy Research) and Ph.D. research here in the School for Policy Studies. Nadia has worked with other members of the School on various projects. The most recent ones are:

1. Intimate partner violence and abuse (online and offline)amongst teenagers in five European countries

2. Exploring the role of faith in influencing what ‘justice’ means for victims/survivors of gender-based violence and for those working to support them

3. Displacement and gender-based violence

The great sperm race: how maths is changing our understanding of fertility

Speaker: Dr Hermes Gadelha

Abstract:

In this lecture, Brazilian-born Dr Hermes Bloomfield-Gadelha will attempt to brainwash the audience into thinking that some exquisite use of mathematics will change your life (they won’t). After aspiring, genius-level mathematical calculations, Gadelha will endeavour to show some predictive insights into the mechanics of these specialised cells during their arduous journey to find the egg. Connecting Newton, Da Vinci, Alan Turing, quantum theory, robots and Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps, this lecture will recount the never-ending mathematical tales of the sperm tail at the fertile union of mathematical logic, medicine and everything.

 

Bio:

Brazilian-born Dr Hermes Gadelha is a poly-disciplinary engineering mathematician working at the fertile union of mathematical logic, engineering, physics and medicine. He employs creative mathematics to nature, industry and the arts, focusing on novel questions and unexplained phenomena in everywhere.
Hermes worked as a Research Fellow in Mathematics at Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge, before going back to Oxford as a Robert Hooke Research Fellow. He was also Lecturer in Applied Mathematics and the External Relations and Public Engagement Officer at the University of York. Today, Hermes is a Senior Lecturer in Applied Mathematics and Data Modelling at the Department of Engineering Mathematics, University of Bristol, and a mathematical fertility expert for the Science Media Centre (SMC), London, UK.

Hermes’ research has generated international recognition, with countless worldwide media press releases and TV interviews, including BBC, Science, New Scientist and Discovery Channel and numerous research projects with industrial parties, governmental organizations and charities.

My top 5 favourite ‘bits’ of veterinary anatomy

Speaker: Dr Julie Dickson

Abstract:

The topic of anatomy is often considered to be full of gory bits, bloody bits, pink blobby bits, and often smelly bits! In fact, anatomy is full to the brim of some really outstanding and incredibly clever bits. Why does the inner wall of the cow’s stomach have a honeycomb pattern? Are rabbits really just small horses? Can vets genuinely create large bone flaps in the horse’s skull? I plan to chat about my favourite areas of veterinary anatomy along with some of my favourite dissections to illustrate why I am so enthusiastic about ‘bits’ of anatomy.

Bio:

Dr Julie Dickson is a Teaching Fellow in Veterinary Integrated Structure and Function.

 

Disability, Innovation, and Cultures: Lovely Cats Made of Care Bears’ Leggings

Speaker: Keir Williams

Abstract

Who is an innovator? What is innovation? In this lecture Dr Keir Williams, Lecturer in Design at the Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship will consider these questions by reflecting on a series of case studies from the world of disability arts and culture. It will draw on models of disability, social media influencers and tourettes-led superheroes.

Biography

Keir is a creative technologist, educator and researcher. Underpinning his approach to all three is a philosophy that recognises the potential for art, design and technologies to make and take on practical and effective roles in wider society and culture. His innovation research and practice considers participatory processes and structures in relation to accessibility, performance, advocacy and the potential of ‘playing the fool’ in all three. He has created commissions for organisations including TATE, ICA London, PS1 New York and Chapter Gallery, Cardiff. His recent creative technology work has included a performance and research residency in the arctic circle, and an oral history project with the MShed museum Bristol. Recent research projects include an ethnographic study on developing technologies for SEN mixed ability classrooms and an innovation training project with former Prisoners in Bristol.

View Keir’s website

 

Security Online: Defence Against the Dark Arts

Speaker: David Bernhard

Abstract:

Barely a week goes by without another story in the news related to cybersecurity. Passwords are stolen, credit card details hacked, personal information leaked. Our own university is regularly a target for phishing attacks. Meanwhile the government has been making noises about ‘banning encryption’. In this talk we’ll have a look at some examples and try not to despair.

Bio:

David is a Teaching Fellow in Computer Science.

 

 

 

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Email: bob-lectures@bristol.ac.uk

Website: www.bristol.ac.uk

Medieval Romance: Unexpected Journeys and Meetings

Speaker: Bex Lyons

Abstract:

The experience of reading medieval – and indeed any – literature can open windows on to new worlds and novel encounters for the reader, with occasionally surprising consequences. This talk considers the ways in which reading medieval romance changed the life of a working class academic from a council estate, and presents some examples from medieval romance to show what this genre is capable of: fantasy, magic, love, chivalry – but most of all offering meetings with people from the past. It highlights the value in finding common ground with those from different contexts to our own, and how medieval literature can – perhaps unexpectedly – point us in the direction of shared human experience.

Bio:

Dr Bex Lyons, Executive Assistant and Teaching Associate in English and Personal Development, Department of English. Bex is a late medievalist with research interests in book and reading history, particularly female owners and readers of Arthurian literature in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century England and their interactions with this corpus. Bex also has research interests in digital academic publishing – an area in which she has a professional background as an editor. She is especially interested in the production of modern editions and translations of medieval texts, and the effects of the digital on modern academic research and publishing. Between 2015-2017 Bex was the Research Associate at University College London on the two-year AHRC and British Library funded project, The Academic Book of the Future.

 

 

 

Find out more about the BoB lectures
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Email: bob-lectures@bristol.ac.uk

Website: www.bristol.ac.uk

What is a sustainable future?

Speaker: Prof Chris Willmore

Abstract:

It’s easy to see sustainability as being about guilt, about stopping doing things. This lecture looks positively at sustainability and the future we want to inhabit. This is about what we want, not what we don’t want. How can we make it fun and achieve a real difference to our university, our city and the world. It will look at how we can change our curriculum, change the campus and learn to tread lightly on the planet. It will reveal why some of the habits you develop at university will stay with you for life- and why some will get ditched. And pose the question – what can you say?

Bio:

Professor of Sustainability and Law, University of Bristol Law School, Chris Willmore qualified and practised as a barrister, before becoming an academic. Her work particularly focuses upon education for sustainability and the concept of a sustainable university. Her UK award winning work on student engagement in city transformation for sustainability won the International Green Gown for Student Engagement in 2017. She is a fellow of the EAUC and of the RSA.

 

 

 

Find out more about the BoB lectures
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Email: bob-lectures@bristol.ac.uk

Website: www.bristol.ac.uk

Alexander Hamilton and the development of the American single market

Speaker: Gervas Huxley

Abstract:

The Broadway musical “Hamilton” celebrates the life of Alexander Hamilton. More than any other founding father Hamilton understood the implications of creating the ‘United States of America”. One of his objectives was to promote trade between the 13 Colonies believing that “commercial enterprises will have much greater scope, from the diversity in the production of different states.” He then asks the following question: “Whether the states are united or disunited [would there not] be an intimate intercourse between them, which would answer the same ends? In other words do we need political union to promote trade? His answer what that if the states were disunited “intercourse would be fettered, interrupted, and narrowed, by a multiplicity of causes.” Hamilton’s ‘multiplicity of causes’ are the eighteenth century version of what today we call non-tariff barriers. Hamilton argued that “unity of commercial… interests, can only result from an unity of government.” This argument resulted in the Commerce Clause of the US constitution.

The lecture will examine the history of the Commerce Clause its role in creating the American Single market and the opposition the Commerce Clause has attracted for more than two hundred years from supporters of states rights. The lecture will compare Euro-Scepticism from Enoch Powel to Jacob Reese Mogg with the Anit-Federalist and States Rights tradition in American history.

Bio:

Gervas Huxley is a Teaching Fellow in the Department of Economics.

 

 

 

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Email: bob-lectures@bristol.ac.uk

Website: www.bristol.ac.uk

Are drugs of abuse the solution to treating depression?

Speaker: Prof. Emma Robinson

Abstract:

Depression and anxiety are the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in modern society and yet treatments are still poorly understood and many patients fail to respond to current therapies. The first antidepressant drugs were developed in the 1950s but their discovery arose from serendipitous observations of drugs developed for other conditions. Psychopharmacology has sought to use these drugs to better understand the causes of mood disorders but progress with developing better treatments has been challenging. This lecture will discuss the history of antidepressants and how we have used these early treatments to better understand mood disorders and develop new drugs including the SSRIs, some of the most widely prescribed drugs used today. However, many patients still fail to respond to treatment. The final part of the lecture will consider new avenues of research and why drugs of abuse, such as ketamine and the psychedelics, are providing a new strategy for treating mood disorders.

Bio:

Emma Robinson Professor of Psychopharmacology, School of Physiology, Pharmacology & Neuroscience

 

 

 

Find out more about the BoB lectures
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Email: bob-lectures@bristol.ac.uk

Website: www.bristol.ac.uk

Can Mathematics Improve Your Baking?

Speaker: Thomas Jordan

Abstract:

Going way back, bakers have had to concoct various ways to efficiently mix dry fruit through dough so it is evenly distributed. How can we describe ‘even distribution’ mathematically and can we find a mathematical process which simulates the baker’s technique? And finally, how could these ideas connect to current research in dynamical systems? Come on down to find out more.

**This lecture will also be live streamed on the BoB lectures Facebook page.**

 

Bio:

Dr Thomas Jordan Senior Lecturer in Pure Mathematics, School of Mathematics, Thomas’ research focuses on dimension theory in dynamical systems.Thomas’ interests include connections between multifractal analysis, large deviations and the thermodynamic formalism, self-similar and self-affine sets, non-conformal dynamical systems and Fourier transforms for invariant measures.

 

 

Find out more about the BoB lectures
Facebook: @boblectures 
Twitter: @BoB_Lectures
Email: bob-lectures@bristol.ac.uk

Website: www.bristol.ac.uk