DEO drop ins. Covering: Re/Play, Blackboard Tests and EMA.

The Digital Education Office are running a series of drop-ins in the upcoming year. The first two will be held in 31 Great George Street.
 
The first session will be split into three:
 
13:30 – 14:30: Replay
14:30 – 15:30: Blackboard Tests
15:30 – 16:30: EMA
 

Contact information

For further information please contact digital-education@bristol.ac.uk

Visit the Digital Education Office homepage for more events and guides.

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Getting the most out of the Blackboard Grade Centre: advanced administration skills for electronic management of assessment (EMA)

Increasing numbers of staff are supporting electronic management of assessment (EMA) in Blackboard. This workshop is aimed at colleagues who wish to deepen their knowledge and expertise of administering the grade centre effectively, in particular when dealing with large cohorts of students. During the workshop participants will be able to explore examples and try out a range of advanced grade centre tools. They will also be given access to a set of resources to take away.
By the end of the workshop participants will:
· be able to apply advanced features of the grade centre to their Courses eg use grading periods to organise assignments by teaching block.
· be able to make the grade centre easier to work with eg for markers and moderators
· have strategies to administer the grade centre effectively including filtered views and managing large cohorts of students
· be able to import and export data from the grade centre from/to other systems.
· be able to ensure controlled student access to relevant grade centre data

Pre-requisites

Participants should already have a basic knowledge of setting up and managing assignments in Blackboard.

Contact information

To book, please see our booking form on Eventbrite. Getting the most out of the Blackboard Grade Centre.
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Blackboard Basics: Marking and Providing Feedback to Online Assignments, see the outcome through the Students’ Eyes (DEO Webinar)

Learn how to make the most of the feedback features in Blackboard inline grading and get an insight into how your students will see their results. As well as talking you through the software we will have time to answer your questions about marking in Blackboard.

This course is suitable for  academic staff and all levels of experience (some basic knowledge is helpful but not necessary). 

This webinar will be presented by Roberta Perli and Roger Gardner from the Digital Education Office.

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Managing Student Access to Online Submission Points in Blackboard: Understanding Pre-Submission Quizzes, Groups and Adaptive Release [DEO Webinar]

Whether you just need a refresher or are new to managing submission points in Blackboard, this short webinar will explain how pre-submission quizzes and groups can be used with adaptive release to manage students’ access to submission points and how you can check if a student can see a submission point or not.

This webinar is suitable for all levels though some basic knowledge of Blackboard would be helpful, but not necessary. This webinar would be most suitable for administrative staff. 

The room will be available from around 15 minutes before the webinar starts.

This webinar will be presented by David Perkins de Oliveira and Naomi Beckett from the Digital Education Office.

Getting the Most out of the Blackboard Grade Centre: Advanced Administration Skills for EMA (DEO)


Increasing numbers of staff are supporting electronic management of assessment (EMA) in Blackboard. This workshop is aimed at colleagues who wish to deepen their knowledge and expertise of administering the grade centre effectively, in particular when dealing with large cohorts of students. During the workshop participants will be able to explore examples and try out a range of advanced grade centre tools. They will also be given access to a set of resources to take away.

By the end of the workshop participants will:

  • be able to apply advanced features of the grade centre to their Courses eg use grading periods to organise assignments by teaching block.
  • be able to make the grade centre easier to work with eg for markers and moderators
  • have strategies to administer the grade centre effectively including filtered views and managing large cohorts of students
  • be able to import and export data from the grade centre from/to other systems.
  • be able to ensure controlled student access to relevant grade centre data

*Participants should already have a basic knowledge of setting up and managing assignments in Blackboard.

500 Words

e-marking as a tool for teachers and learners: evaluation of a GradeMark trial

Author: Andy Wakefield

School/ Centre: School of Biological Sciences

Provision of timely, detailed feedback is important for student learning (1), yet can be challenging to achieve in practice. Technology may hold the solution, say Dr Andy Wakefield.

The tech bit

Implementation of electronic management of assessment (EMA), has enormous potential for transforming teaching and learning (2,3). One widely used online tool is Turnitin, equipped with an originality-checker but also an e-marking function called GradeMark. This allows markers to annotate and grade student work digitally without the need to download or print work; no more stacks of paperwork on your desk and fewer trees being felled.

Aims

Here I summarize my findings from a GradeMark trial within the School of Biological Sciences (SoBS), in which I asked:

  1. Does using GradeMark allow for more efficient use of staff time?
  2. How does using GradeMark support student learning?

Methods

I conducted the trial on a third-year unit which consisted of four modules, each assessed via a 500-word report. I provided students with instructions for the e-submission process and teachers with guidance on how to access reports and use key tools within GradeMark. Student (n=19) and staff (n=3) opinions were gathered via end-of-unit feedback questionnaires.

Results

In general, both students and academics had positive views of GradeMark. Students:

  • found the digital workflow easy to use;
  • appreciated how easy it was to obtain/access their feedback;
  • liked the specific nature of their feedback;
  • liked the breakdown of marks offered by the rubric system;
  • liked the improved clarity of digital feedback.

Staff found GradeMark easy to use and believed that they provided the same amount of feedback for students in the same (n=1) or less (n=2) time, relative to marking paper-scripts. When asked about future use, all three agreed they would “definitely like to continue to use online marking”.

Discussion

From my study I found that e-marking can allow for more efficient use of staff time. It can also support student learning by allowing easy access to clear, timely, individualised, assessment feedback. These findings echo those published in the literature (4,5). One of the strengths of GradeMark is the QuickMark comment function, which allows for saved comments to be quickly reused. This function doesn’t currently exist within the Blackboard e-marking toolkit, which is the standard for EMA at UOB.

Other benefits to e-marking include: increased privacy of marks and feedback; and a greater likelihood that students will revisit feedback due to ease of access (3). However, focusing all our attention on the quality and quantity of our written comments may not fully address current student dissatisfaction with feedback. Large cohorts limit time available for student-teacher communication that was once integral to the feedback process (6). But don’t worry, technology provides us with multiple ways to switch from monologue back to dialogue. Why not try mediating discussion boards and blogs within Blackboard, or investigate adaptive release functionality to prevent release of student marks until they have reflected on their feedback? Engagement with EMA offers professional development benefits to staff and is claimed to be “essential for reasons of both pedagogy and efficiency(2).

References

  1. Gibbs, G. & Simpson, C. (2004) Conditions under which Assessment supports Student Learning. Learning and Teaching in Higher Education, 1, 3-31
  2. Ambler, T., Breyer, Y., & Young, S. (2014) Piloting online submission and online assessment with Grademark. In S. Kennedy-Clark, K. Everett & P. Wheeler (Eds.), Cases on the assessment of scenario and game-based virtual worlds in higher education (pp. 125-151). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.
  3. Ferrel, G. & Gray, L. (2016) Electronic management of assessment. Using technology to support the assessment life cycle, from the electronic submission of assignments to marking and feedback. Jisc guide. Available at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/guides/electronic-assessment-management [Accessed 16/05/2017].
  4. Chew, E. & Price, T. (2010) Online originality checking and online assessment – an extension of academics or disruption for academics. In S. L. Wong, S.C. Kong & F.-Y. Yun (Eds.), Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Computers in Education (pp. 683-687). Putrajaya, Malaysia: Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education.
  5. Buckley, E. & Cowap, L. (2013) An evaluation of the use of Turnitin for electronic submission and marking and as a formative feedback tool from an educator’s perspective. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44 (4), 562-579.
  6. Nicol, D. (2010) From monologue to dialogue: improving written feedback processes in mass higher education. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 35 (5), 501-517.

If you’d like to share your work with BILT, please email bilt-info@bristol.ac.uk for more information.